Tag Archives: relaxation

My Next Chapter

Integrative Restoration InstituteSo I wanted to fill you in on what I’ve been up to. Im coming from Kripalu, where I’ve completed my Level 1 iRest®Yoga Nidra training with Richard Miller and am fascinated by what I’ve learned.

Yoga Nidra is loosely translated to “the sleep of the yogi”, and refers to a meditative technique that allows the practitioner to lie down and make themselves as comfortable as possible, allowing for any and all props to improve comfort, including blocks, pillows, blankets, etc… The teacher then guides the practitioners through a guided meditation for the duration of the session, directing their attention to different areas of the body.

I began my yoga studies back in 1999 with Joan Ruvinksy, who, with Richard Miller, studied under Jean Klein, and who introduced Yoga Nidra very early on into our classes together. I later came back to the Yoga Nidra practice with Level 1 iRest®Yoga Nidra trained Teacher Kelly McGrath, whose classes slowly led me right up to my training. As one who has practiced Yoga Nidra, I simply related to the sense of peace and relaxation the practice brought back to me, but little did I know or fully comprehend the science behind iRest®Yoga Nidra or how it could potentially change the lives of other.

As taken directly from the Integrative Restoration Institute’s website, “iRest Yoga Nidra, one of the principal programs offered by IRI, is a research-based transformative practice of deep relaxation and meditative inquiry that:

– releases negative emotions and thought patterns
– calms the nervous system
– develops a deep capacity to meet any and all circumstances you may encounter in life

Research has shown that iRest Yoga Nidra effectively reduces:

PTSD
Depression
Anxiety
Insomnia
Chronic pain
Chemical dependency”

One of my main motivators to study and teach yoga was, from the start, to help people heal, but I had no idea when I registered for this training that I would be passed on tools to practically and peacefully help people. I now feel ready and galvanized to apply the techniques and the science behind them to not only offer relaxation to people, but to potentially aid in pre and post-partum depression, in helping people make up for sleep debt, and to generally bring people to a place of peace. As taken again from the IRI website, “People using iRest report:

Decreased stress, anxiety, fear and depression
Decreased insomnia and sleep disturbances
Decreased perception of chronic and acute pain
Improved interpersonal relations
Increased energy levels
Increased sense of control in their lives
More confidence and joy in their lives
Greater sense of peace and well-being
iRest programs are typically taught as a guided meditation. Students can expect to lie down or sit comfortably during the practice. It is comprised of the following:

Development of intention
Body sensitivity training
Breath and energy awareness
Systematic neutralization of:
Negative body sensations and stress
Negative feelings & emotions
Negative beliefs, images and memories
The experience of joy and well-being
Freedom from the sense of separation generated by the senses and mind
The ability to experience peace amidst the changing circumstances of life

I am unbelievably honoured to have had the opportunity to study this past week with Richard, his assistants, and the wonderful group of students who joined us at Kripalu. I am ready to bring this new phase of my intention and my life to those who feel they might benefit from what I’ve learned. I will from this day on be offering Individual iRest®Yoga Nidra Sessions (Dyads) as well as group iRest®Yoga Nidra sessions. Please, feel free to contact me for more information or to arrange a session. This training has taken me a step further along my Dharmic path, and I would be honoured to have you be a part of it.

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The Phoenix From The Flame

I’ve been preparing for the workshop and lecture I’ll be giving later this year for the Luna Yoga Teacher Training on Hindu mythology and how it relates to the yoga postures, and I’d be lying if I said that I wasn’t passionately loving every second of my research. I’ve been going over the myths I’m already familiar with, as well as hearing some of the more obscure ones for the first time, and I keep having these moments of realization where I can really stand back from my life and see how the path I’m on is truly my dharma…it’s unreal, intense, and satisfying, all at the same time. As I finish with one myth, I put down my books and walk away from the computer, and sit down in silence to think about what I’ve read, and how it applies to my life and my approach to life. The approach that I have to yoga is 90% philosophical and 10% physical, and this is why: I believe that the asana practice is purifying for the body, absolutely. But I also believe that the practice allows for a shift in consciousness, one that opens up new windows of insight and belief systems that challenge who we find ourselves in this moment, how we got to this point, and where we see ourselves moving forward with the knowledge and insight that we have at our disposal. I believe that the mission for all of us in this life is to fully realize that the only thing that matters is to re-connect to the higher energy that is the source of every single thing in existence around us, and within us. Everything else is secondary. How we come to that realization is really up to each of us to figure out, but I can attest to the fact that yoga absolutely opens up gateways to the soul, gateways that can shed a bright, refreshing light into the annals of our consciousness to allow us to see with new eyes.

One aspect of the asana practice that has always fascinated me is the final posture we take before closing out the class: savasana, deep relaxation, corpse pose. When I first started practicing in 1999, savasana was the lifeboat at the end of the long swim through what was then my practice. Whatever happened during class, I knew I could collapse at the end and recharge through the act of doing nothing. At that time, I remained conscious of the fact that my thoughts kept whirling, my eyes would continue moving around, and all I could do was stand in judgement of myself, staying critical of the fact that I couldn’t let go. That changed after a while. I then found myself hearing a voice telling me to connect to the sky, which became my mantra and which enabled me to visualize a beam of light emanating from my third eye and beaming upwards, and it was through this connection to a higher energy that I found myself completely letting go and finding that I had indeed drifted off to some other place during my savasana, a place where I was still conscious, but not of, or in, the body. And now, recently, 12 years later, I have had another revelatory awakening from my savasana: this posture of letting go, where we allow the body to absorb the physical practice we’ve just treated ourselves to, has taken on a new role, one where I set my intention as I lay down to put to sleep that which does not serve me and which identifies with the ego, so that I can rise up at the end of the relaxation period re-born and re-focused. Ever since the adoption of this new approach to savasana, I feel like I have been speeding closer and closer to a new place of spirituality and connection to all that is. Call it re-birth, call it a step closer to a state of enlightenment, whatever. All I know is that yoga has once again offered me a tool where I can be responsible and accountable for shedding off the attributes, events and conversations that have only served to weigh me down and distract me from my focus towards truth, so that I can rise up again after my repose with renewed focus, strength and determination. Focus on my soul and tapping into what it already knows, strength to be unwavering in my journey, and determination to pass on what I myself am living and learning, understanding that if I don’t share these insights, then I’m truly missing the point. And so I hope that you reading this will try out this approach..to savasana, or to any process that you find yourself undertaking that has both a beginning and an end. Allow yourselves to infuse whatever it is you do with the knowledge that you have the power to let go of what doesn’t serve you, and to come out the other side of it with a new sense of clarity and understanding. The tools are already there…we just have to pick them up and use them.

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